Inspiration and Commitment

Hemingway wrote about “a clean, well-lighted place.” Virginia Woolf wanted “a room of her own.” E.M. Forster wrote about “a room with a view.” Sandra Dee wanted “a summer place…”

Okay, I’m starting to digress. But you knew what I was saying at the outset, right? A writer needs a place to write. Ideally that place is quiet and distraction-free so you can muster the enormous focus required to write a novel. Or for that matter, a short story.  Or a magnificent poem.

Studies have shown that, unlike computers, we do not multitask. We focus on one thing at a time, and when we try to do more, we are in reality rapidly shifting our focus in ways that undermine the quality of our work. Only one task can be in focus. The rest are on autopilot. This can make the already daunting task of writing even more daunting, especially when there are children in the house and dirty laundry, etc.

I totally get it. While I raised my first batch of children, I learned to block out everything. You can tell your kids not to bother you unless they’re bleeding or on fire, but we all know it doesn’t actually work that way. So we end up scrabbling for time wherever we can find it. I’ve written in shopping malls and hospitals and parking lots. When you’re trying to get a book finished, I told myself, you can’t be too choosy.

If you’ve read my Red Sneaker novels, you know I advise aspiring writers to commit to a written contract in which they promise themselves they will establish a schedule and stick to it–two hours a day, four hours a day, six. Or so many pages or words a day, whatever works for you. Sign the contract in the back of the book and get the other members of your household to sign it too. You want them to respect your commitment? Get it in ink.

Some distractions you can eliminate yourself. Hire a babysitter if possible. Get someone else to pick the kids up after school, or let them ride the bus. Tell the other members of the household to do their own laundry. And by all means, turn off those email and text pop-ups on your computer. Shut off the wi-fi. Pry your cell phone out of your hands.

At the Rose State conference last weekend, Katherine Center talked about stealing away to a family place in Galveston to write. Michael Crichton used to check into the Beverly Hills Hilton for a month to do the same. I personally have spent too much of my life in hotels and have no desire to ever do it again.

Happily, there is an alternative. The writer’s colony.

A decade ago, there were more than a hundred writer’s colonies in the US. Today, there are about thirty. If we do not support them, soon there will be none. Lara and I travel to Eureka Springs at least twice a year to spend time at the Writer’s Colony at Dairy Hollow, a beautiful mountain retreat. Costs all of $75 a night, food included. You can write all day without interruption, surrounded by some of the most glorious scenery on earth. Last year I even held two five-day writer’s retreats there, and they were huge successes. I’m doing it again next year (June 7-11). Lara and I have spent the past few days at Dairy Hollow (I’m writing this on our beautiful balcony) and I felt compelled to share this inspirational opportunity with you.

The most important thing, of course, is that you find the time and quiet to write. If a writer’s colony will help you get it done, go for it. Dairy Hollow still has space available in 2016, and lots more in 2017. Make the commitment to your writing future. Make your reservation today.

Writer’s Colony at Dairy Hollow