Patronage in the Modern World

If you’ve followed my social media this week, it will come as no surprise that my topic today is Patronage. My Patreon campaign launched on Friday. Click here.

Asking is hard. At least for me it is, and I think for most of you as well. Here is the rugged land of rags-to-riches fables and Protestant work ethic, we tend to exalt self-reliance. Asking suggests vulnerability, or imperfection, and no one wants that. Writers in particular want to be independent. Sure, we want a zillion people to read our books, but we also want the freedom to do the work that matters to us.

I recently read Amanda Palmer’s book, The Art of Asking, and it had a big impact on me. You can get the short version in her terrific TED talk (Click here). (She also has an excellent Patreon campaign.) The book discusses how hard it was for her to ask for support from her fans and admirers. She didn’t want to be perceived as a loser, or as taking advantage. She’s married to Neil Gaiman, but she didn’t want to be dependent on a husband’s fans. She much preferred a community that admired her work and wanted to support it.

Once upon a time, of course, virtually all artists depended upon patronage. Before copyright laws existed, that was about the only way for writers–and painters and musicians–to survive. We have intellectual property protection today–sort of. The internet and bit torrents have made it possible to distribute other people’s work without paying them, and sadly, millions download pirated material. The publishing industry has changed dramatically and eBooks are not terribly profitable for most. Which is why you are seeing a rise in patronage, a new relationship between artists and their fans, through sites like Patreon and Kickstarter and Indiegogo and such. You like what artists are doing? Here’s how you let them know.

I’ve been running this Red Sneaker Center for Writers for many years, but I’ve always made a point of keeping the books and audios and stuff dirt cheap. I didn’t want anyone to have to agonize over whether they could afford to buy them. You want to be a writer? Here’s help–take it. But of course, writing those books takes time, newsletters must be distributed, developing apps is expensive…you get the idea. Like Amanda Palmer, I would rather sell the work at cost and be supported by people who appreciate what I’m doing.

So I launched the Pastreon campaign. If you’d like to help keep this Red Sneaker school going, please check it out. While you’re there, look at the other artist Patreon pages. Many people are doing fantastic work, and they could you use your help, too. A tiny contribution makes a big difference–if many people pitch in.

Let me share what one of the first contributors to my campaign wrote. This truly touched my heart, because I thought, HE GETS IT! He said:

“I’m thrilled that this tool exists to help support artists. In your case I have literally stopped many times from listening to the Red Sneaker books (which I listen to again and again in audiobook format) to think how unfair it is that I paid such a small price for such amazing and valuable learning. I have wanted to do something to say thank you for that and make things more balanced in paying for what I’ve gained.

This gives me a chance to show my support for your work with Red Sneaker Writers. Consider my pledge a nudge in that direction 😉 I can’t believe you manage the output of high quality work and help you do without it being full time. Just wow!”
​                                –Jason W.

Lots of cool gifts and book-related goodies if you join, too. Please check it out: https://www.patreon.com/willbern

2 thoughts on “Patronage in the Modern World”

  1. I had never heard of patronage support until you started your campaign. I think know it’s a tool for artists to use, just as surely as newsletters, blogs, book signings, and other methods.

    Thanks for asking and sharing.

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