Are Audiobooks Taking Over the World?

If you’ve been reading this newsletter long, you’ve heard me say that audiobooks are growing exponentially. And it’s still true–only more so. Audiobooks are now the fastest growing sector of the book market. In fact, audiobook sales have more than tripled in the last five years. Consumers bought almost 90 million audiobooks in 2016, driving sales to $2.1 billion, up 42% from 2012. Hachette, Penguin Random House, and Macmillan are doubling their audiobook production.

Clearly, many people love to listen to books. You see people everywhere wearing earbuds and assume they’re listening to music–but they might be listening to your book. Digitalization has made audiobooks less expensive and easy to download. Cellphones are now audiobook players. Being old school, I want to be snobby and suggest that audiobooks somehow “aren’t as good,” but in truth, research indicates that people who listen get the same enriching experience as those who read with their eyes. As an author, you can take charge of your own audiobook, so you don’t have to compromise your vision.

This is why many major A-list writers are now producing audio-only books. Michael Lewis has sold over ten million books and is a contributing editor at Vanity Fair. Nonetheless, when he wrote his latest political narrative, he didn’t sell it to VF–he sold it to Audible. You can’t read it–but you can listen to it, and he reads it himself. He has now signed a mutiyear contract with Audible for more original stories. Others striking deals with Audible for original work include historian Robert Caro, novelist Jeffrey Deaver, actor David Spade, children’s book author Jack Gantos, and science-fiction novelist John Scalzi. “You have to go where the market is,” Scalzi said. “You can’t just give them the same old thing.”

The new turf war is Amazon/Audible fighting with traditional publishers to acquire audio rights. Audible has 150 original audio works currently in production, and is also commissioning one- and two-person plays from emerging playwrights. Reese Witherspoon signed with them to develop audio originals. Audible reportedly paid a seven-figure sum for the audio rights to Wild Game, a memoir by Adrienne Brodeur, after an auction involving fourteen publishers. They paid almost as much for St. Marks is Dead, a nonfiction book by Ada Calhoun, again outbidding major competition.

I’ve known abut the advantages of audiobooks for some time. How many of you are on this mailing list because you heard the audio of one of my Red Sneaker books? The audiobooks significantly outsell the print editions. But–and this is true of every innovation–if you want to participate in a changing marketplace, you have to know what’s going on out there. Yes, we all know about self-publishing, but there are so many other opportunities for today’s writers. Wattpad, a free platform where people can post their novels, has resulted in publishing contracts and large audiences for many authors. Podcasting has become one of the most effective ways to promote books. Fan fiction is another potential way to acquire an audience. Anna Todd scored a six-figure contract and a Paramount movie deal after her fan fiction Wattpad novel After found a breakout audience.

The publishing world changes every day–and you need to stay on top of it. I’ve always made sure the Red Sneaker conference is an innovator, not an imitator, being the first to address new topics, coming up with presenters and programming ideas others copy later. This year, we will have sessions on all the above-mentioned topics, including a live demonstration and step-by-step walkthrough on audiobook creation. Join us and see if there are opportunities that help you achieve your writing dreams.

Click here to register for the conference!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *